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Hermann Staudinger Lectures

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Hermann Staudinger Lectures

Die Hermann-Staudinger-Lecture Series ist eine im Jahr 2008 von der School of Soft Matter Research initiierte Vortragsreihe, zur der die naturwissenschaftlichen FRIAS Schools zwei- bis dreimal jährlich meist internationale Nobelpreisträger zu einem Vortrag nach Freiburg einladen. Die Vortragsreihe wurde nach dem Freiburger Nobelpreisträger Prof. Hermann Staudinger benannt, der von 1926-1951 an der Freiburger Universität lehrte.

Staudinger's groundbreaking elucidation of the nature of the high-molecular weight compounds he termed Makromoleküle paved the way for the birth of the field of polymer chemistry. Staudinger himself saw the potential for this science long before it was fully realized. He was appointed a Professor at Albert-Ludwig University Freiburg in 1926 and founded the first polymer chemistry journal in 1940. In 1953 Staudinger received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his discoveries in the field of macromolecular chemistry.

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Video

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  1. 21st Hermann Staudinger Lecture with Nobel Laureate Randy Schekman (Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, Berkely), 09.03.2016

    Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies (FRIAS) - Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg

    Unconventional secretion of proteins and RNA from cultured human cells

    Large particles, such as lipoproteins, collagen and extracellular vesicles are secreted from animal cells in vivo and in cell culture.  These particles represent a challenge for the normal secretory machinery. We have found that the rigid rod of procollagen can be accommodated in a giant transport vesicle dependent on the usual machinery involved in traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum.
    Extracellular vesicles are secreted by budding into an endosome or from the cell surface.  Extracellular vesicles package a select set of micro RNAs that are sorted by an RNA binding protein and are dependent on a short nucleotide sequence that constitutes an RNA sorting signal.


  2. 18. Hermann Staudinger Lecture mit Nobelpreisträger David Wineland, 09.12.2014

    Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies (FRIAS) - Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg

    Superposition, Entanglement, and Raising Schrödinger’s Cat

    Research on precise control of quantum systems occurs in many laboratories throughout the world, for fundamental research, new measurement techniques, and more recently for quantum information processing. I will briefly describe experiments on quantum state manipulation of atomic ions at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), which serve as examples of similar work being performed with many other atomic, molecular, optical (AMO) and condensed matter systems around the world. This talk is in part the “story” of my involvement that I presented at the 2012 Nobel Prize ceremonies.


  3. 16th Hermann Staudinger Lecture with Nobel Laureate Jules Hoffmann, 21.01.2014

    Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies (FRIAS) - Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg

    Innate immunity : from flies to humans

    Insects make up nearly 80% of all extant species on earth and present a formidable challenge as they put one third of humanity at continuous risk of often severe diseases, namely through their role as vectors of various types of pathogens. Insects have long been known to be resistant to various types of bacterial, fungal, viral and parasitic infections. The mechanisms underlying this resistance, other than the well known process of phagocytosis, have only been addressed relatively recently, and a general simplified picture of these defences will be presented. The fruitfly Drosophila is to be credited for much of the progress in the field. Genetic analysis has identified two signaling pathways which control the expression of antimicrobial peptides: the Toll pathway, which primarily controls the response to fungi and Gram-positive bacteria, and the IMD pathway which is efficient in fighting Gram-negative bacterial infections. Unexpectedly, the unravelling of the Drosophila antimicrobial defences has had an impact on understanding some essential facets of mammalian immunity. It has also led to a renewed interest in innate immunity, a long neglected field in the study of antimicrobial defences in general. In particular, the contribution of the Drosophila model to our present understanding of innate immunity, from sea anemones to humans, will be highlighted.


  4. 11th Hermann Staudinger Lecture with Nobel Laureate Werner Arber, 19.01.2012

    Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies (FRIAS) - Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg

    Nobel Laureate Werner Arber presented the 11th Staudinger Lecture “From Microbial Genetics to Molecular Genetics and to Molecular Evolution” on 19th January 2012. Arber earned the 1978 Nobel Prize in Physiology/Medicine together with Daniel Nathans and Hamilton Othanel Smith for the discovery of restriction endonucleases, which lead to the development of recombinant DNA technology. This basic knowledge greatly facilitated further studies on structural and functional characteristics of genetic information. Scientists discussed conjectural risks of their experimentations which led to the introduction of appropriate guidelines. In order to evaluate long-term evolutionary risks of genetic engineering, natural mechanisms of spontaneous genetic variation had to be understood at the molecular level and compared with strategies of genetic engineering. Again, microbial genetic approaches revealed that many different specific molecular mechanisms belonging to three qualitatively different natural strategies contribute to the overall genetic variation, the driving force of biological evolution. In his lecture, Arber discussed philosophical and practical implications of these insights into the natural process of biological evolution.


  5. When Coal is Gone (10. Hermann Staudinger Lecture)

    Robert B. Laughlin (Physik-Nobelpreisträger)

    Vortrag gehalten am 12. Mai 2011


  6. Intracellular Proteolysis: Mechanisms, Structures, and Application (8. Hermann Staudinger Lecture)

    Robert Huber (Max-Planck-Institut für Biochemie in Martinsried und Nobelpreisträger für Chemie 1988)

    Vortrag gehalten am 16. Dezember 2010


  7. Why can't time run backwards? (7. Hermann Staudinger Lecture)

    Nobelpreisträger Anthony J. Leggett (Department of Physics, University of Illinois, USA)

    Vortrag gehalten am 23. November 2010


  8. 1st Hermann Staudinger Lecture with Nobel Laureate Douglas D. Osheroff, 27. Juni 2008

    Douglas D. Osheroff (Stanford University, Departments of Physics, Applied Physics)

    For the first Hermann Staudinger Lecture, on Friday, June 27th 2008, the Freiburg Institute of Advanced Studies (FRIAS) welcomed a world-renowned physicist, Douglas D. Osheroff of Stanford University, Departments of Physics and Applied Physics. In 1996 Osheroff was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics with David Lee and Robert C. Richardson for discovering the superfluidic nature of 3He. This discovery was made in 1971 while Osheroff was a graduate at Cornell University.

Audio

Abonnieren per RSS | iTunesU
  1. 21st Hermann Staudinger Lecture with Nobel Laureate Randy Schekman (Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, Berkely), 09.03.2016

    Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies (FRIAS) - Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg

    Unconventional secretion of proteins and RNA from cultured human cells

    Large particles, such as lipoproteins, collagen and extracellular vesicles are secreted from animal cells in vivo and in cell culture.  These particles represent a challenge for the normal secretory machinery. We have found that the rigid rod of procollagen can be accommodated in a giant transport vesicle dependent on the usual machinery involved in traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum.
    Extracellular vesicles are secreted by budding into an endosome or from the cell surface.  Extracellular vesicles package a select set of micro RNAs that are sorted by an RNA binding protein and are dependent on a short nucleotide sequence that constitutes an RNA sorting signal.


  2. 16th Hermann Staudinger Lecture with Nobel Laureate Jules Hoffmann, 21.01.2014

    Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies (FRIAS) - Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg

    Innate immunity : from flies to humans

    Insects make up nearly 80% of all extant species on earth and present a formidable challenge as they put one third of humanity at continuous risk of often severe diseases, namely through their role as vectors of various types of pathogens. Insects have long been known to be resistant to various types of bacterial, fungal, viral and parasitic infections. The mechanisms underlying this resistance, other than the well known process of phagocytosis, have only been addressed relatively recently, and a general simplified picture of these defences will be presented. The fruitfly Drosophila is to be credited for much of the progress in the field. Genetic analysis has identified two signaling pathways which control the expression of antimicrobial peptides: the Toll pathway, which primarily controls the response to fungi and Gram-positive bacteria, and the IMD pathway which is efficient in fighting Gram-negative bacterial infections. Unexpectedly, the unravelling of the Drosophila antimicrobial defences has had an impact on understanding some essential facets of mammalian immunity. It has also led to a renewed interest in innate immunity, a long neglected field in the study of antimicrobial defences in general. In particular, the contribution of the Drosophila model to our present understanding of innate immunity, from sea anemones to humans, will be highlighted.


  3. When Coal is Gone (10. Hermann Staudinger Lecture)

    Robert B. Laughlin (Physik-Nobelpreisträger)

    Vortrag gehalten am 12. Mai 2011


  4. Intracellular Proteolysis: Mechanisms, Structures, and Application (8. Hermann Staudinger Lecture)

    Robert Huber (Max-Planck-Institut für Biochemie in Martinsried und Nobelpreisträger für Chemie 1988)

    Vortrag gehalten am 16. Dezember 2010


  5. Why can't time run backwards? (7. Hermann Staudinger Lecture)

    Nobelpreisträger Anthony J. Leggett (Department of Physics, University of Illinois, USA)

    Vortrag gehalten am 23. November 2010


  6. 1st Hermann Staudinger Lecture with Nobel Laureate Douglas D. Osheroff, 27. Juni 2008

    Douglas D. Osheroff (Stanford University, Departments of Physics, Applied Physics)

    For the first Hermann Staudinger Lecture, on Friday, June 27th 2008, the Freiburg Institute of Advanced Studies (FRIAS) welcomed a world-renowned physicist, Douglas D. Osheroff of Stanford University, Departments of Physics and Applied Physics. In 1996 Osheroff was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics with David Lee and Robert C. Richardson for discovering the superfluidic nature of 3He. This discovery was made in 1971 while Osheroff was a graduate at Cornell University.

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